Our Recipes

Around Our Home Away From Home -- Our Recipes

White Squash Pudding by Mrs. Mathilde Bourque

My Mama didn’t bake very often.  One thing she liked was White Squash Pudding.  Daddy planted white scallop squash seeds and always seemed to produce a great crop.  He was sure to bring some in from the garden so that Mama could make White Squash Pudding  or “Poutine Cibleme” in French.

5 cups squash (cut in pieces and boiled in lightly salted water until tender)
1 cup sugar
1 cup flour
4 egg yolks (reserve whites for meringue))
1 bar margarine
1 tablespoon vanilla (Cinnamon or nutmeg can be submitted for the vanilla.)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Mix all ingredients.   Pour in a greased pan or black skillet.  Bake at 350 for 45 minutes.  

Beat egg whites until stiff.  Add 3 tablespoons sugar and ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar and beat until stiff.

Remove pudding from oven and spread meringue over pudding, taking care to seal the edges.  Raise oven temperature to 400 degrees and place pudding in oven until meringue is golden brown.  

Cool or serve warm.  

ADDIS’ SWEET POTATO CRUNCH

You bake the sweet potatoes, peel and mash them then add brown sugar and pure butter.    Grind the pecans and put that on the top of the sweet potatoes. Take care to remove all the wood from the pecans.  They have to be clean. Bake it and it is good!

ADDIS’ OYSTER CORNBREAD DRESSING

For the oyster dressing, we used half pork and half chicken for the dressing mix.  We cooked the mix with all the seasonings and made cornbread and crumbled it.  Then, we stirred in the cooked dressing mix and added a quart of oysters and ground pecans. Next, we covered it air tight and left it moist. 

Around Our Home Away From Home, Our Stories

By J.M. Morrow Nursing Home 18 Oct, 2017
Thursday, October 12, 2017, is Movie Time! Once a month, Sandy Esteve and I host a movie. Sandy installs a curtain over the window next to the television. The Activities Directors pop popcorn, lights are dimmed and "My Fair Lady" is on. A whole movie is just too long so we watched the first half in the morning and then it was lunch and nap time. Sandy and I returned at 2:00 p.m. for the second half of that eight Academy Award winner with Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn. It was a hit! We are thinking of showing "The King and I" next month; but, one of the gentlemen(?), who is in his 90's, thinks we should show a Playboy flick instead!

On Mondays at 2:30 p.m., it is Bingo time. Usually, there are about 35 residents who play. This week, 38 showed up.  The residents love Bingo and I would think that this is a great activity for senior citizens. Gloria Hebert, one of the regulars, says "Bingo works your mind."

I don't know what prompted me to volunteer to call Bingo; but, I am so happy I did. I love it as much as the residents. Everyone is always eager to start and the Activities Directors tell me that I cannot break the rules and start early. I have to start at 2:30. So, about 2:15 or so, with mic in hand, I start my little program. We pray an Our Father and we recite the Pledge of Allegiance and then, we practice shouting BINGO!! I am old too, I tell my resident friends. My hearing is failing. After I can hear them shouting Bingo! easily, we move on to hand, arm and neck exercises. No, the residents are not eager to exercise but, they put up with me because they love Bingo.

Gloria Hebert plays two Bingo cards--one for herself and one for her husband, Lloyd, who patiently sits next to her. Lloyd has Alzheimer's. He looks as though he is in perfect health and very strong.  After visiting with Gloria following Bingo last Monday, I understand just how damaging that disease can be, not only to the patient, but to the caregiver as well. I recalled Nicholas Sparks' "The Notebook" as I sat chatting with Gloria after the nurse wheeled Lloyd to their room.

Gloria was born in Pointe-aux-Chens, a community in Terrebonne Parish near Montegut. The story of the life of Lloyd and Gloria Hebert  continues:

"My family lived in Houma. We moved there when I started high school. My parents had six children, three boys and three girls. I still have a sister and two brothers who live in Houma. I have one sister who was a French teacher who lives in Alabama. The others are deceased.

"I graduated from Terrebonne High in June and got married to Lloyd Hebert in July. Lloyd was born in Chauvin and we met in high school in the General Science class. I couldn't draw worth a hoot  and  Lloyd did my drawings for me. It was the start of our wonderful life. Through life, dancing was one of our favorite activities.  My dad had a dance  hall in Pointe-aux-Chens.  I was brought up in there and learned to dance at a young age. Seems like Lloyd always knew how to dance.  He and I have danced many a dance, at home and whenever we had the opportunity.  Even now, I dance a bit in our room at the nursing home.
 
"Lloyd joined the Marines after graduating from high school and was stationed in North Carolina where we lived as newly weds. We also lived in South Carolina before Lloyd was discharged and we returned to Houma. We both went to work in a shrimp canning company in Houma. Lloyd was a Jack's Cookie man for ten years. He was transferred from Houma to Hammond.  At one time, Lloyd and I lived in New Orleans where our two oldest children were born. My dad was an oyster man. Lloyd went to work for him at the French Market. Lloyd would stay there at night and sell sacks of oysters.

"I've been involved with the seafood business for most of my life--first with my dad, and then with Lloyd when he started his own seafood company. Lloyd went into business with Albert "Tubby" Lyons, a man who ran for State Representative at one time. He and Lloyd formed a partnership but when Tubby passed away, his wife took over the business. Lloyd went to work selling oilfield supplies and then after consulting with a lawyer, he decided to open his own company. We rented a building in Moss Bluff for our retail and wholesale seafood business.

"Lloyd did his own cooking. He made, among other things, stuffed crabs, stuffed shrimp, boiled crawfish and etouffees. After we got that running well,  we opened a restaurant in Moss Bluff close to Highway 171. We bought a grocery store and converted it into our restaurant which we named 'Lloyd's Cajun Kitchen.' Lloyd developed his recipes and prepared the food. He cooked everything. All kinds of seafood. At one time, we started with steaks but people were too picky. For one customer, Lloyd fixed three steaks before that customer was satisfied. The next day, we took steaks off the menu.

"The restaurant and seafood business was a lot of work for Lloyd. In addition to all of the regular work, he would drive to Houma to pick up the seafood--oysters, shrimp, etc., he needed.

"I worked in the business too. I did the books and when the restaurant opened at night, I worked the register. Sometimes a member of the staff would not show up and I had to pitch in. Or, the cooks would come in drunk and I would have to help there. I had to carry the trays, did dishes, whatever had to be done, I did it.

"It came a time, a Christmas Eve, when Lloyd called to tell me that he was closing for the holidays. I told him to close the restaurant and leave it closed. I told him he was no longer in a shape to do all of that work. I asked him not to post a date when we would reopen. The restaurant business is very hard work. The crowds were large. The people would stand outside. We would have had to build another restaurant or add on to the one we had to accommodate all of our many customers.  Of course, they were very disappointed when we closed. They wanted us to reopen.

"But, Lloyd had high blood pressure. He needed surgery on his knee that was hurting him.  He was in no shape to be working.  In the end, my sons had to come and help Lloyd because he was in so much pain. I never regretted closing the restaurant. It was enough."
By J.M. Morrow Nursing Home 30 Aug, 2017
Lucille knows how important it is for families to leave their words for the younger generations. It is truly giving of yourself. Lucille knows who her parents and grandparents were, what they did, and what they endured. Sharing this information with her family and now the J. Michael Morrow Nursing Home community and beyond, records history. In addition, it just feels good to laugh when we relive those special family
stories.
By J.M. Morrow Nursing Home 18 Aug, 2017

I've been calling Bingo on Mondays at 2:30 at J. Michael Morrow Nursing Home.  It is so much fun for me and the wonderful residents seem to enjoy every minute.  At first, I struggled to hear their "Bingo" calls.  So, on my second visit, I explained that I, too, was old and my ears were not as good as they once were. I asked everyone to shout BINGO!! And, they did. We practiced several times. Next, I told them about my stiff fingers and several admitted that they too had stiff hands and fingers. So, a few hand exercises and stretches (and lots of laughs) followed and then everyone was ready for that first Bingo game.  

But, although I love to call Bingo, today, August 7, 2017,  I had something else in mind. I asked the Activities Directors, Mary and Andrea, if I could visit Lena Miller instead. Of course, they agreed and they happily called Bingo Monday.

Facebook is an amazing way to connect with people. Tracy Petit Frederick sent me a message via Facebook regarding a picture of Cecelia Elementary School children..  Tracy's husband, Craig Frederick, is a nephew of Lena's.  And, Lena and Craig share a birthday, August 10th.  Tracy told me that Uncle Luther, Aunt Anna and Craig were taking Lena to Little Big Cup, a restaurant in Arnaudville, to celebrate Lena and Craig's birthday last week. It would be Lena's 88th!

Tracy said:  "Since she  (Lena) has been in the Nursing Home, we have made an annual tradition to take her to lunch. Her brother Luther and sister Anna come with us and we are occasionally joined by other siblings when they are available."

The contact with Tracy made me want to write the Lena Frederick Miller Story. In addition, Tracy volunteered to send pictures and bio. I was on my way!

On Monday, I walked to Lena's room.  There are two beds in the room. The first bed was empty and a lady slept peacefully in the other. I walked back to the Nurses Station and asked if Lena Miller was in the second bed? She confirmed that was Lena's bed and so I went back and sat in Lena's comfortable chair for about 15 minutes. She did not stir. She continued her soft, easy breathing. I wrote her a note on an Apostleship of Prayer leaflet for August, left it on her bedside table and decided I would have to try again another day.

Several of my friends were sitting in the hallway and I shook hands and got hugs and I just hated to leave. So, I decided to visit with Bertha Powell and Rita Bouterie down Hall A.  As I entered their room, they were trying to open the water pitcher to get ice for their cups. I joined in the action. Soon, problem solved,  I was sitting on Bertha's bed and we were visiting like three teenagers. I took my phone out and showed Rita and Bertha their nursing home website stories and pictures that  Sandy Esteve and I had written and a whole hour passed in friendly conversation and much laughter. I got my goodbye hugs and started down the hall and without thinking I was at Lena's door. She was sitting on her bed.  I introduced myself and soon another hour had gone by.

It is easy and comfortable to talk with Lena. It was like I had known her all of my life. She grew up in Parks, the second child of Arista Frederick and Edia Guidry.  After Lena married Joseph Miller, they continued to live in Parks. Some people call Joseph "Joe"  and some call him "U.J." and Lena calls him "J." The couple had two children: Lisa Kay and Lonnie. Lisa, like her parents and grandparents before her, lives in the Parks area. Lonnie and his family live in St. Martinville, but not far from  New Iberia. Lena lovingly sings their praises. She is a much-loved mother, grandmother, aunt, great aunt, sister and friend. She told me she had been at J. Michael Morrow for two years. Then, she said: "Two years here and nine years a widow."

For some, the above words would be uttered with sadness; but, not for Lena Miller. It is evident how much she misses her mother and her husband, a sister, a brother and other loved ones she has lost. But, Lena has courage and she makes the most of her life at J. Michael Morrow Nursing Home. Her family has helped her make the adjustment from home to her "Home Away From Home." They visit and bring her lots of pictures of her loved ones.  Some of the pictures are in beautiful frames on her window sill.  Having those pictures are very important to her and that helps her keep loved ones fresh in her mind. Lena keeps up with her large extended family.

While I visited, I started taking picture off of her bulletin board over her bed and I would ask her to tell me about the person in the picture. One was Lena pictured with Emily and Mary, two of the nurses at J. Michael Morrow. When she looked at the picture, she kissed it. She explained that Emily and Mary had gotten her to walk again after a bad fall and hip injury.  It became necessary for the nurses to bathe her in bed and she was so very grateful.  When I turned the picture over, it was labeled:  "Restorative Grad, 6-16-2016." Lena's courage helps her deal with whatever comes her way, even injuries that require long hours of therapy. 

So, how did Lena meet a boyfriend back in those days? Lena met "J" Miller through a girlfriend. Lena and "J" enjoyed a long courtship. "J" became "Joe" to his Army buddies while he served his country in the Korean Conflict.  When he came home on leave, he wanted to marry Lena; but, she chose to wait until his military service was over.  She doesn't exactly remember the details; but, it was  the custom at the time for the man to ask the father permission to marry his daughter. Lena is certain "J" asked her Dad for her hand in marriage and in a few months, the couple was honeymooning in Port Arthur, Texas. It was the farthest Lena had traveled from home. "J" had a brother, Francis, and his wife Merilla Miller, who lived in Port Arthur and, as that too was the custom, the newly married couple honeymooned with Francis and Merilla.

Tracy wrote this about her husband's aunt: "On May 2, 1953, she married Joseph Miller, called 'U.J.' at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Parks. She and U.J. lived next door to her parents in Parks."  Tracy explains that the genealogy comes from two other members of the family.  Lena's sister in law Grace, the wife of Steve, and, Lena's daughter Lisa Kaye have done a wonderful job researcing and writing stories about this close extended family.

Lena explains that she was petite and for her wedding, she chose a light blue suit which was purchased from La Parisienne on Jefferson Street in Lafayette. The suit did not open in the middle but was shaped in a large scallop on the left side and had many tiny buttons for a very special look. Her hat was the prettiest she had ever had. It fit Lena perfectly. Most hats were large on her head but her wedding hat was comfortable. There were many beautiful tiny white and pink flowers over the matching light blue hat. Lena is proud of the many compliments she received on her wedding day.  She explained that the hat had cost almost as much as the suit.   

With much enthusiasm, Lena recalled a trip to Nashville, Tennessee! Lena and three or four friends visited Nashville and had a wonderful time. She loves country music and in her lifetime, Lena loved to sing country music. That brought her great pleasure and she lights up just thinking about it.

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